We can do this.

I know this story so well. We hear this in our clinics in Kenya every single day...

She was HIV-positive. "I thought now nothing in my life was going to be right, nothing that I have ever dreamed of would come true," she said.

But she still wanted to start a family. A few months later, she was pregnant. She assumed the baby would be born HIV-positive and simply hoped her child would live a long, healthy life with medication.

There was a lot Tinzi didn't know. HIV-positive women who don't seek medical care have roughly a 40 percent chance of passing the virus on to their child. But with proper medical care - and a steady dose of anti-retroviral drugs - that number can essentially be reduced to zero. The problem is, treatment isn't available in many parts of the world. And even if it is, women aren't always aware of the option.

(From Goats and Soda)

She's a mother talking to another mother - and both are HIV-positive. That's the mentoring role played by Phelokazi Tinzi, who works for mothers2mothers in South Africa.

We know how to prevent babies from being born with HIV. We can have an HIV-free generation. With support and education and access to medicines, women like Tinzi will only have tears of joy to shed over their HIV-negative babies.

Posted at 04:44

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